Executive-legislative disconnection in post-colonial Hong Kong: The dysfunction of the HKSAR’s executive-dominant system, 1997-2012

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the British colonial days, Hong Kong’s system of governance was usually described as an “executive-dominant system.” When crafting Hong Kong’s post-colonial political order in the 1980s, the Chinese leaders decided to maintain this executive-dominant style of governance in the HKSAR. Nevertheless, in spite of a wide range of constitutional powers conferred upon the Chief Executive by the Basic Law as well as the installation of a pro-government majority in the Legislative Council, unlike its colonial predecessor, the HKSAR government struggles to maintain its dominant position vis-à-vis the legislature over policy-making. This article attributes the dysfunction of the executive-dominant system after 1997 to Beijing’s resistance to the development of party-based government in Hong Kong. By marginalising political parties in the organisation and policy-making process of the HKSAR government, the executive and legislature have become disconnected since 1997, and the coalition between the non-partisan Chief Executive and pro-government parties remains fragile. In order to get Hong Kong out of the existing political quagmire, the development of some form of party-based government in Hong Kong is a critical issue that the Chinese government and the HKSAR government must confront. Copyright © 2014 CEFC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5-14
JournalChina Perspectives
Volume2014
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Citation

Fong, B. C. H. (2014). Executive-legislative disconnection in post-colonial Hong Kong: The dysfunction of the HKSAR’s executive-dominant system, 1997-2012. China Perspectives, 2014(1), 5-14.

Keywords

  • Executive dominance
  • Executive-legislative relations
  • Legislative success rate
  • Hong Kong

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