Examining the perceptions of curriculum leaders on primary school reform: A case study of Hong Kong

Chi Keung Alan CHEUNG, Wai Wa Timothy YUEN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In an effort to enhance the quality of teachers and teaching, and to lead internal curriculum development in primary schools, the Hong Kong Education Bureau created a new curriculum leader post entitled primary school master/mistress (curriculum development) or PSMCD for short. The main purpose of the study was to examine the perceptions of these curriculum leaders on their competence in leading the primary school reform. Using a stratified random sampling technique, 125 curriculum leaders were chosen to participate in the current study. Survey questionnaire and semi-structured interviews were conducted. The findings of the study suggest that PSMCDs in general supported the goals and the rationale of the reform. In addition, they also agreed that moderate progress had been made in implementing the curriculum reform in their school. Though progress had been made in many areas, our findings have highlighted several key challenges that these PSMCDs faced in performing their roles. These challenges include heavy workload, learner diversity in the classrooms, the use of diversified modes for assessment, and having too many reforms at the same time. Implications and recommendations are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1020-1039
JournalEducational Management Administration & Leadership
Volume45
Issue number6
Early online dateJul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2017

Citation

Cheung, A. C. K., & Yuen, T. W. W. (2017). Examining the perceptions of curriculum leaders on primary school reform: A case study of Hong Kong. Educational Management Administration & Leadership, 45(6), 1020-1039.

Keywords

  • Curriculum leaders
  • Hong Kong
  • Primary schools
  • School reform

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