Examining the effectiveness of guided inquiry with problem-solving process and cognitive function training in a high school chemistry course

Niwat TORNEE, Tassanee BUNTERM, Kerry LEE, Supaporn MUCHIMAPURA

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of traditional versus guided inquiry (with problem-solving process and cognitive function training) on high school chemistry knowledge, science process skills, scientific attitudes, and problem-solving competency. Two classes of students were recruited from three classes of Grade 11 students at one school in North-eastern Thailand. Using a split-plot design, students were assigned to an experimental (N = 34) and a control group (N = 31), and were administered (a) learning achievement tests (chemistry knowledge, science process skills, and scientific attitude), (b) a problem-solving competency test, and c) tests of cognitive functioning. The findings showed that students' learning achievement and problem-solving competency in the guided inquiry group were significantly higher than in the traditional group. The effect of the new teaching method does not seem to stem solely from improvement in cognitive functioning. We attributed the improvement to greater flexibility in the amount of information provided by the teachers, more effortful processing by the students, and greater collaboration amongst the students. Copyright © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-149
JournalPedagogies
Volume14
Issue number2
Early online dateApr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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chemistry
school
student
Group
achievement test
science
teaching method
Thailand
learning
flexibility
school grade
teacher

Citation

Tornee, N., Bunterm, T., Lee, K., & Muchimapura, S. (2019). Examining the effectiveness of guided inquiry with problem-solving process and cognitive function training in a high school chemistry course. Pedagogies, 14(2), 126-149. doi: 10.1080/1554480X.2019.1597722

Keywords

  • Guided inquiry
  • Problem solving
  • Cognitive function
  • Science process skills
  • Scientific attitudes