Environmental impacts of iron ore tailings: The case of Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong

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Abstract

Disposal of iron ore tailings along the shore of Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong has altered the adjacent environment. Due to the ever-expanding population, the vast development of various industries, and the lack of sanitary control, the existing pollution problem of Tolo Harbour is serious. The iron ore tailings consist of a moderate amount of various heavy metals, e.g., copper, iron, manganese, lead, zinc, and a lower level of macronutrients. A few living organisms have been found colonizing this manmade habitat. Higher metal contents were also found in the tissue of Paphia sp. (clam);Scopimera intermedia (crab);Chaetomorpha brychagona (green alga);Enteromorpha crinita (green alga); and Neyraudia reynaudiana (grass). The area can be reclaimed by surface amelioration using inert materials, soils, or organic substrates, and by direct seeding, using nontolerant and tolerant plant materials. Reclamation of the tailings would improve the amenity of the adjacent environment and also mitigate pollution escaping to the sea. Copyright © 1981 Springer-Verlag New York, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-145
JournalEnvironmental Management
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1981

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Ore tailings
Iron ores
Algae
Ports and harbors
iron ore
tailings
Environmental impact
harbor
Pollution
environmental impact
green alga
Reclamation
Tailings
Heavy metals
Manganese
pollution
Zinc
Lead
amenity
Tissue

Bibliographical note

Wong, M. H. (1981). Environmental impacts of iron ore tailings: The case of Tolo Harbour, Hong Kong. Environmental Management, 5(2), 135-145. doi: 10.1007/BF01867333

Keywords

  • Tailings
  • Shore animals
  • Marine algae
  • Higher plant
  • Iron ore
  • Soil fungi
  • Restoration procedures
  • Hong Kong