Enhancing peer acceptance of children with learning difficulties: Classroom goal orientation and effects of a storytelling programme with drama techniques

Yin-kum LAW, Shui-fong LAM, Wilbert LAW, Zoe W. Y. TAM

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Peer acceptance is an important facilitator for the success of inclusive education. The aim of the current study is twofold: (1) to examine how classroom goal orientation is associated with children’s acceptance of peers with learning difficulties; and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of a storytelling programme with drama techniques on children’s acceptance of peers with learning difficulties. The participants were 86 Grade 3 students from a Hong Kong primary school, randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 45) and a control group (n = 41). The findings indicated that the more the students perceived that their classroom was performance-approach oriented, the less they would accept their peers with learning difficulties in doing things together. After the intervention, the students in the experimental condition, compared to their counterparts in the control group, were more likely to render financial assistance and have affective acceptance to their peers with learning difficulties. Copyright © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)537-549
JournalEducational Psychology
Volume37
Issue number5
Early online date29 Jul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Citation

Law, Y.-K., Lam, S.-F., Law, W., & Tam, Z. W. Y. (2017). Enhancing peer acceptance of children with learning difficulties: Classroom goal orientation and effects of a storytelling programme with drama techniques. Educational Psychology, 37(5), 537-549. doi: 10.1080/01443410.2016.1214685

Keywords

  • Inclusive education
  • Peer acceptance
  • Storytelling
  • Drama
  • Classroom goal orientation

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