Employing an activity-theoretical perspective to localize an educational innovation in an elementary school

Cher Ping LIM, Lee Yong TAY, John HEDBERG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two grade 5 classes (11-12-year-olds) were introduced through an inquiry-based pedagogy to scientific ideas and concepts within a 3D game-like multi-user virtual environment (MUVE). This article explores how a particular set of strategies and conditions might encourage and sustain the use of the MUVE, Quest Atlantis (QA), as a problem-based learning environment. This set of strategies and conditions includes the commitment of the teachers and their support through professional development, ongoing technical assistance, and students' orientation and scaffolding. Ensuring the appropriateness of the technology access and structure of the curriculum required time-table planning. These factors predict the likely survival of an education innovation in the school and the possibility of scaled up for more widely-used pedagogical practice. Copyright © 2011, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-344
JournalJournal of Educational Computing Research
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

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Virtual reality
elementary school
Innovation
innovation
technical assistance
Curricula
learning environment
school grade
Education
commitment
Students
Planning
curriculum
planning
teacher
school
education
student
time
Problem-Based Learning

Citation

Lim, C. P., Tay, L. Y., & Hedberg, J. (2011). Employing an activity-theoretical perspective to localize an educational innovation in an elementary school. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 44(3), 319-344.