Electronic dietary recording system improves nutrition knowledge, eating attitudes and habitual physical activity: A randomised controlled trial

Ming Yan CHUNG, Pui Sze Queenie LAW, Shirley Siu Ming FONG, Wai Yee Joanne CHUNG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methods: Sixty adults aged 20–60 with a body mass index ≥ 25 were recruited and randomly assigned to one of three groups: a group using an electronic system (EG), a group using a food diary (FD) and a control group using nothing (CG) to record food intake. All participants took part in three 60–90 nutrition seminars and completed three questionnaires on general nutrition knowledge, habitual physical activity levels and eating attitudes at the beginning and end of the 12-week study. The pre- and post-test scores for each questionnaire were analysed using a paired sample t-test. Results: Significant improvements in the domain of ‘dietary recommendations’ were found in the EG (p = 0.009) and FD groups (p = 0.046). Great improvements were found in ‘sources of nutrients’, ‘choosing everyday foods’ and ‘diet–disease relationships’ in EG and FD groups. EG group showed greater improvement in the work index and sport index. Conclusion: An electronic dietary recording system may improve eating and exercise behaviour in a self-monitoring process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-413
JournalEating Behaviors
Volume15
Issue number3
Early online dateMay 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Citation

Chung, L. M. Y., Law, Q. P. S., Fong, S. S. M., & Chung, J. W. Y. (2014). Electronic dietary recording system improves nutrition knowledge, eating attitudes and habitual physical activity: A randomised controlled trial. Eating Behaviors, 15(3), 410-413.

Keywords

  • Behavioural change
  • Electronic dietary recording system
  • Eating attitude
  • Nutrition knowledge
  • Physical activity level
  • Self-monitoring

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