Effects of self-efficacy and attributions on teachers’ well-being: A mediational analysis

Hui WANG, Sonia RAHIMI, Nathan C. HALL, Melanie M. KELLER

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

The present study evaluated the effects of both teachers' self-efficacy and the way they attribute their occupational stress on burnout, job satisfaction, and quitting intentions based on the assumption that teachers’ attributions should mediate the relationship between self-efficacy and adjustment outcomes. Practicing teachers (N = 536) were recruited from Ontario and Quebec in Canada to complete the web-based questionnaire. Our results showed that teachers’ self-efficacy and attributions for stress both predicted the adjustment outcomes, and that their effects did not overlap (attributions do not mediate). Teachers’ self-efficacy regarding student engagement and the attribution variable reflecting a belief in personal control over occupational stress were found to be the most important predictors of teachers’ burnout, job satisfaction, and quitting intentions. Copyright © 2014 AERA.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Citation

Wang, H., Rahimi, S., Hall, N. C., & Keller, M. M. (2014, April). Effects of self-efficacy and attributions on teachers’ well-being: A mediational analysis. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) 2014 Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, US.

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