Effects of self-assessment diaries on academic achievement, self-regulation, and motivation

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although students who self-assess effectively often learn better, creating effective, low-cost interventions to help them do so is a critical challenge. This study examined the effects of a self-assessment diary intervention on 74 Form 1 (Mage = 12.2 years) students’ academic achievement, self-regulation, and motivation. After each homework assignment, students in the experimental group (n = 37) completed a standardised self-assessment diary, while students in the control group (n = 37) did no additional work. Difference-in-differences analyses showed that self-assessment diaries significantly enhanced students’ academic achievement, self-efficacy, and intrinsic value. Students with lower past achievement benefited more than other students from the intervention. The intervention had no significant impact on effort regulation and self-reflection. Furthermore, effort-regulation, self-reflection, self-efficacy, and intrinsic value all did not mediate the link between self-assessment diaries and academic achievement. The findings can inform researchers and educators aiming to help students self-assess effectively to improve their learning. Copyright © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)562-583
JournalAssessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice
Volume27
Issue number5
Early online date05 Oct 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Citation

Yan, Z., Chiu, M. M., & Ko, P. Y. (2020). Effects of self-assessment diaries on academic achievement, self-regulation, and motivation. Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 27(5), 562-583. doi: 10.1080/0969594X.2020.1827221

Keywords

  • Self-assessment
  • Diary
  • Self-regulation
  • Motivation
  • Learning intervention

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