Effects of executive function on word reading among learners with Chinese as a second language

Mingjia CAI, Xian LIAO

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

The association between executive function (EF) skills and Chinese word reading, and the moderating effect of grade were investigated among 200 primary students with Chinese as a second language (CSL). EF explained 7% of the variance in word reading, with inhibition and attention shifting as unique predictors. Similar results were found when separately examining the role of EF in single-character reading and two-character word reading. No significant moderating effect of grade was found in the present study. Findings highlighted the importance of EF skills, especially inhibition and attention shifting, to word reading among CSL learners. The non-significant moderating effect of grade demonstrates the sustained and stable demand of EF during word reading even among middle and higher grade CSL learners. Copyright © 2023 AERA.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2023
Event2023 Annual Meeting of American Educational Research Association: "Interrogating Consequential Education Research in Pursuit of Truth" - Chicago, United States
Duration: 13 Apr 202305 May 2023
https://www.aera.net/Events-Meetings/2023-Annual-Meeting

Conference

Conference2023 Annual Meeting of American Educational Research Association: "Interrogating Consequential Education Research in Pursuit of Truth"
Abbreviated titleAERA 2023
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityChicago
Period13/04/2305/05/23
Internet address

Citation

Cai, M., & Liao, X. (2023, April 13–May 5). Effects of executive function on word reading among learners with Chinese as a second language [Poster presentation]. 2023 Annual Meeting of American Educational Research Association: "Interrogating Consequential Education Research in Pursuit of Truth", Chicago, United States.

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