Effects of cognitive‐based instruction on mathematical problem solving by learners with mild intellectual disabilities

Kevin Kien Hoa CHUNG, Hing Yee TAM

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23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This study examined the effects of different approaches to teaching learners with mild intellectual disabilities to solve mathematical word problems. Method: Thirty Chinese students with mild intellectual disabilities from a special school in Hong Kong were taught using conventional instruction, worked example instruction, and cognitive strategy instruction. A cross‐subjects experimental design was used to compare the effects of the three instructional approaches on immediate and delayed tests. Results: Students presented with worked example and cognitive strategy instruction solved more problems correctly and generally outperformed students presented with conventional instruction in both immediate and delayed tests. In addition, learners receiving worked example and cognitive strategy instruction were more able to maintain and generalise their previous knowledge and skills to solve novel problems than those receiving conventional instruction. Conclusions: The findings indicate that learners can profit from worked example and cognitive strategy instruction which can promote problem‐solving skills and mathematical learning. Copyright © 2005 Australasian Society for the Study of Intellectual Disability Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)207-216
JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Citation

Chung, K. K. H., & Tam, Y. H. (2005). Effects of cognitive‐based instruction on mathematical problem solving by learners with mild intellectual disabilities. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 30(4), 207-216.

Keywords

  • Problem solving
  • Intellectual disability
  • Cognitive strategy
  • Worked example
  • Mathematics
  • Hong Kong