Effect of glycemic index of breakfast on energy intake at subsequent meal among healthy people: A meta-analysis

Fenghua SUN, Chunxiao LI, Yanjie ZHANG, Stephen Heung Sang WONG, Lin WANG

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16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Meals with low glycemic index (GI) may suppress short-term appetite and reduce subsequent food intake compared with high-GI meals. However, no meta-analysis has been conducted to synthesize the evidence. This meta-analytic study was conducted to assess the effect of high- and low-GI breakfast on subsequent short-term food intake. Trials were identified through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials, and manual searches of bibliographies until May 2015. Randomized controlled and cross-over trials comparing the effect of low- with high-GI breakfast on subsequent energy intake among healthy people were included. Nine studies consisting of 11 trials met the inclusion criteria. Only one trial was classified with high methodological quality. A total of 183 participants were involved in the trials. The meta-analytic results revealed no difference in breakfast GI (high-GI vs. low-GI) on subsequent short-term energy intake. In conclusion, it seems that breakfast GI has no effect on short-term energy intake among healthy people. However, high quality studies are still warranted to provide more concrete evidence. Copyright © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Original languageEnglish
Article number37
JournalNutrients
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

Citation

Sun, F.-H., Li, C., Zhang, Y.-J., Wong, S. H.-S., & Wang, L. (2016). Effect of glycemic index of breakfast on energy intake at subsequent meal among healthy people: A meta-analysis. Nutrients, 8(1). Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu8010037

Keywords

  • Low glycemic index
  • Appetite
  • Meta-analysis

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