Effect of detector collimator and sample thickness on 0.662 MeV multiply Compton-scattered gamma rays

Manpreet SINGH, Gurvinderjit SINGH, B.S. SANDHU, Bhajan SINGH

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43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The simultaneous effect of detector collimator and sample thickness on 0.662 MeV multiply Compton-scattered gamma photons was studied experimentally. An intense collimated beam, obtained from 6-Ci 137Cs source, is allowed to impinge on cylindrical aluminium samples of varying diameter and the scattered photons are detected by a 51 mm×51 mm NaI(Tl) scintillation detector placed at 90° to the incident beam. The full energy peak corresponding to singly scattered events is reconstructed analytically. The thickness at which the multiply scattered events saturate is determined for different detector collimators. The parameters like signal-to-noise ratio and multiply scatter fraction (MSF) have also been deduced and support the work carried out by Shengli et al. [2000. EGS4 simulation of Compton scattering for nondestructive testing. KEK proceedings 200-20, Tsukuba, Japan, pp. 216-223] and Barnea et al. [1995. A study of multiple scattering background in Compton scatter imaging. NDT & E International 28, 155-162] based upon Monte Carlo calculations. Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-378
JournalApplied Radiation and Isotopes
Volume64
Issue number3
Early online dateNov 2005
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2006

Citation

Singh, M., Singh, G., Sandhu, B. S., & Singh, B. (2006). Effect of detector collimator and sample thickness on 0.662 MeV multiply Compton-scattered gamma rays. Applied Radiation and Isotopes, 64(3), 373-378. doi: 10.1016/j.apradiso.2005.08.015

Keywords

  • Singly and multiply Compton-scattered events
  • Saturation thickness
  • Signal-to-noise ratio
  • Multiply scatter fraction (MSF)

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