Educational reform in Japan towards inclusion: Are we training teachers for success?

Christine Irene FORLIN, Norimune KAWAI, Satoshi HIGUCHI

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Within a tradition of a dual regular and special education system in Japan, the Government is promoting education reform that encourages an inclusive approach to education. This research investigates whether teachers are being trained for successful inclusion in Japan by reviewing the perceptions of all pre-service teachers in one university regarding their readiness for becoming inclusive practitioners. A move towards an inclusive approach to education in Japan is being promoted through collaboration and support between teachers trained in regular and special education. Thus, different perceptions of pre-service teachers preparing to work either in elementary schools or in special schools are a particular focus of this research. Discussion considers the need for better teacher preparation due to the very low understandings of inclusion and Japanese pre-service teachers’ perceived lack of skills, knowledge, experience, or training for an inclusive approach. Copyright © 2014 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-331
JournalInternational Journal of Inclusive Education
Volume19
Issue number3
Early online dateJul 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Citation

Forlin, C., Kawai, N., & Higuchi, S. (2015). Educational reform in Japan towards inclusion: Are we training teachers for success?. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 19(3), 314-331.

Keywords

  • Inclusion
  • Special education
  • Teacher training
  • Japan

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