Economic insecurity and social protection for labour: The limitations of Hong Kong’s adhocism during the financial crises

Kim-Ming LEE, Kam Yee LAW

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction After decades of neoliberal globalisation, economic insecurity spreads around the globe and affects people of every walk of life. Rising economic inequality becomes an important concern for both advanced and developing countries. Nonetheless, political and business elites around the world never question the neoliberal agenda, despite the economic crises that happen every now and then. The year 2007 may mark the turning point of neoliberal globalisation. After the global financial tsunami kicked off from the burst of the sub-prime mortgage bubble in the United States in 2007, the global economy is facing an economic hardship never heard of since the Great Depression in the 1930s. Hong Kong, as a highly open economy, has also been severely damaged by the financial tsunami. Copyright © 2014 Ka Ho Mok and Maggie K.W. Lau for selection and editorialmatter; individual contributors, their chapters.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationManaging social change and social policy in greater China: Welfare regimes in transition
EditorsKa-Ho MOK, Maggie K. W. LAU
Place of PublicationAbingdon, Oxon
PublisherRoutledge
Pages47-69
ISBN (Electronic)9781134575077, 9781315887579
ISBN (Print)9780415706346
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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financial crisis
labor
globalization
economics
Great Depression
open economy
economic crisis
Hong Kong
elite
developing country
economy

Bibliographical note

Lee, K.-M., & Law, K.-Y. (2014). Economic insecurity and social protection for labour: The limitations of Hong Kong’s adhocism during the financial crises. In K. H. Mok, & M. K. W. Lau (Eds.), Managing social change and social policy in greater China: Welfare regimes in transition (pp. 47-69). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.