Early self-regulation: kindergarten teachers’ understandings, estimates, indicators, and intervention strategies

Alfredo BAUTISTA ARELLANO, Kate E. WILLIAMS, Kerry LEE, Siu Ping NG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

Self-regulation is arguably one of the most crucial predictors of school readiness, academic achievement, and lifelong well-being. While educators in the prior-to-school years have a pivotal role to play in stimulating growth in early self-regulation, less is known about their knowledge and practices in this area. This interview study was conducted with 71 kindergarten teachers in Hong Kong. Content analysis and descriptive statistics were employed to analyze the transcripts. We found that participants: (1) had a limited and superficial understanding of the notion of self-regulation; (2) estimated that approximately one quarter of their students displayed self-regulation problems; (3) had difficulties articulating what constitutes indicators for self-regulation problems in young children; and (4) lacked intervention strategies to strengthen children’s self-regulation, specifically preventive strategies. Educational policymakers, researchers, curriculum designers, teacher educators and school leaders are urged to better prepare early childhood practitioners in this area. Limitations and future research lines are discussed. Copyright © 2024 National Association of Early Childhood Teacher Educators.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Early Childhood Teacher Education
Early online dateMar 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Mar 2024

Citation

Bautista, A., Williams, K. E., Lee, K., & Ng, S.-P. (2024). Early self-regulation: kindergarten teachers’ understandings, estimates, indicators, and intervention strategies. Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/10901027.2024.2327424

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