Domestic wastewater treatment using batch-fed constructed wetland and predictive model development for NH₃-N removal

S.Y. CHAN, Yiu Fai TSANG, L.H. CUI, H. CHUA

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, the performance of a pilot-scale batch-fed constructed wetland in treating domestic wastewater from small community was tested. The principal of the system capitalizes on the pollutant removal mechanisms of the soil–plant–microbial interactions of constructed wetlands, and the system operation was integrated with the rhythmical movement of wastewater and air that similar to the operation of conventional sequencing batch reactor. Based on the hydraulic loading of 0.91 m³/m²/day and the daily maximum contact time of 18 h, the system could achieve around 60% removal efficiency for carbonaceous matters. The removals of ammonia nitrogen and phosphorus were about 50 and 40%, respectively, while the removal of total suspended solids was approaching 80%. Mathematical models were developed to describe ammonia nitrogen degradation in the batch-fed constructed wetland. Three analytical approaches including multivariate regression, first-order kinetics and mass balance analysis were done. Prediction model was formulated to predict the system removal efficiency of ammonia nitrogen. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)297-305
JournalProcess Biochemistry
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

Citation

Chan, S. Y., Tsang, Y. F., Cui, L. H., & Chua, H. (2008). Domestic wastewater treatment using batch-fed constructed wetland and predictive model development for NH₃-N removal. Process Biochemistry, 43(3), 297-305. doi: 10.1016/j.procbio.2007.12.009

Keywords

  • Domestic wastewater
  • Batch-fed
  • Constructed wetland
  • Ammonia nitrogen
  • Predictive model
  • Coal slag
  • Cyperus alternifolius

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