Does it matter when you review?: Input spacing, ecological validity, and the learning of L2 vocabulary

John ROGERS, Anisa CHEUNG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study is a conceptual replication of Rogers and Cheung’s (2018) investigation into distribution of practice effects on the learning of L2 vocabulary in child EFL classrooms in Hong Kong. Following a pretest, treatment, delayed posttest design, 66 primary school students (Cantonese L1) studied 20 vocabulary items over three training episodes under spaced-short (1-day interval) or spaced-long (8-day interval) learning conditions. The spacing of the vocabulary items was manipulated within-participants, and learning was assessed using crossword puzzles following a 4-week delay. While Rogers and Cheung (2018) resulted in minimal overall learning with a slight advantage for the spaced-short group, this study found large learning gains across the experimental conditions with no significant differences between the two learning schedules. Taken together, these results provide evidence that the results from previous research examining input spacing with adult populations in laboratory contexts might not generalize to authentic child learning contexts. Copyright © 2020 The Author(s). Published by Cambridge University Press.
Original languageEnglish
JournalStudies in Second Language Acquisition
Early online date09 Jul 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 09 Jul 2020

Citation

Rogers, J., & Cheung, A. (2020). Does it matter when you review?: Input spacing, ecological validity, and the learning of L2 vocabulary. Studies in Second Language Acquisition. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1017/S0272263120000236

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