Does family obligation matter for students' motivation, engagement, and well-being?: It depends on your self-construal

Ronnel Bornasal KING, Fraide A. GANOTICE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies on family obligation have mostly focused on its main effects. The aim of this study was to examine (a) how family obligation is associated with motivation, engagement, and well-being, and (b) how relational-interdependent self-construal moderates the effects of family obligation on these key outcomes. Filipino university students (n = 466) were recruited to answer the relevant questionnaires. Results showed that students with a higher sense of family obligation had better academic and well-being outcomes. These effects were more pronounced for those with high levels of relational-interdependent self-construal. In particular, for those with a high relational-interdependent self, family obligation boosted autonomous motivation and life satisfaction, as well as buffered against disaffection and negative affect. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-248
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume86
Early online dateJun 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2015

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Citation

King, R. B., & Ganotice, F. A. (2015). Does family obligation matter for students' motivation, engagement, and well-being?: It depends on your self-construal. Personality and Individual Differences, 86, 243-248.

Keywords

  • Family obligation
  • Relational-interdependent self-construal
  • Motivation
  • Engagement