Do reading practices make a difference? Evidence from PIRLS data for Hong Kong and Taiwan primary school Grade 4 students

Shek-Kam TSE, Xiaoyun Moon XIAO, Hwa-Wei KO, Joseph Wai-Ip LAM, Sau-Yan HUI, Hung-Wai NG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the influence of classroom pedagogic reading practices and out-of-school practices in explaining why the reading attainment of Hong Kong Grade 4 students was superior to that of their counterparts in Taiwan in the 2006 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study. Analyses of scores from 9301 students (4712 from Hong Kong and 4589 from Taiwan) revealed that independent reading in school made a distinctive contribution to the reading performance of Hong Kong and Taiwan students after controlling for the effects of students' and parents' reading attitudes, the availability of supportive home educational resources and student engagement in a range of reading practices. Out-of-school informational reading was found to be negatively associated with students' reading attainment for both Hong Kong and Taiwan students. There was evidence that reading aloud in class in Taiwan classrooms significantly contributed to the Taiwan students' poor reading performance. Copyright © 2014 British Association for International and Comparative Education.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-393
JournalCompare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Volume46
Issue number3
Early online dateJun 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2016

Citation

Tse, S.-K., Xiao, X.-Y., Ko, H.-W., Lam, J. W.-I., Hui, S.-Y., & Ng, H.-W. (2016). Do reading practices make a difference? Evidence from PIRLS data for Hong Kong and Taiwan primary school Grade 4 students. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education, 46(3), 369-393. doi: 10.1080/03057925.2014.927732

Keywords

  • Reading attainment
  • Reading practice
  • Reading attitude

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