Do goals lead to outcomes or can it be the other way around?: Causal ordering of mastery goals, metacognitive strategies, and achievement

Ronnel Bornasal KING, Dennis Michael MCINERNEY

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Goal theory research has mostly focused on the unidirectional effects of goals on learning strategies and academic achievement. Reciprocal relationships have mostly been neglected. Aims: The primary aim of this study was to examine the reciprocal relations and causal ordering of mastery goals, metacognitive strategy use, and academic achievement. Sample: A total of 8,773 secondary students drawn from three cohorts in Hong Kong participated in the study. Results: We found that mastery goals and metacognitive strategy use exhibited reciprocal effects. Interestingly, and contrary to previous research, academic achievement was shown to predict mastery goal adoption and metacognitive strategy use but not the other way around. Results of the model were shown to be invariant across students of different genders, year levels, and school bands. Implications for goal theory research are discussed. Copyright © 2016 The British Psychological Society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)296-312
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Psychology
Volume86
Issue number2
Early online dateFeb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2016

Citation

King, R. B., & McInerney, D. M. (2016). Do goals lead to outcomes or can it be the other way around?: Causal ordering of mastery goals, metacognitive strategies, and achievement. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 86(2), 296-312.

Keywords

  • Cross-lagged relations
  • Causal ordering
  • Mastery goal
  • Metacognitive learning strategies

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