Distinct and common issues in the psychosocial adaptation to cancer across cultures

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

As the People's Republic of China (PRC) modernizes, colorectal cancer (CRC) demonstrates the sharpest increases in incidence and mortality, becoming one of the most common cancers in major cities including Shanghai and Hong Kong. Despite the need to understand correlates of adjustment so as to optimize clinical and psychosocial services among Chinese people with CRC, very little is known about these people. Distinct sociocultural backgrounds warrant cautions in transferring the findings in the West to Asian populations. This chapter presents a series of psychosocial studies, ranging from qualitative interviews to validation of psychometric instruments and multi-wave prospective studies, in samples of Chinese CRC patients in Hong Kong. A qualitative study identifies the dynamics of the adaptation process and specific issues faced by Chinese CRC patients throughout the illness trajectory. Based on the qualitative findings, psychometric self-report instruments are developed to validly and reliably capture the socioculturally-specific issues of adjustment in Asian cancer patients. Longitudinal studies then seek to explore the psychological mechanisms that might inform the development of psychological services for Asian patients as well as those in the West. Implications for developing cross-cultural psycho-oncological research and practice are discussed. © 2011 Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationColorectal cancer: Risk, diagnosis and treatments
EditorsJulianne E. JENKINS
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherNova Science Publishers
Pages1-50
ISBN (Print)9781617613012
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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cancer
psychometrics
Hong Kong
qualitative interview
longitudinal study
incidence
illness
mortality
China

Citation

Hou, W. K. (2010). Distinct and common issues in the psychosocial adaptation to cancer across cultures. In J. E. Jenkins (Ed.), Colorectal cancer: Risk, diagnosis and treatments (pp. 1-50). New York: Nova Science Publishers.