Dissonance theory as a model for inducing change in student teachers' practice

Derek SANKEY, Elizabeth Jean MELLOR, Sharon Lynne BRYANT

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to explore a model for promoting change that can be used in teacher education programmes for both in-service and pre-service teachers. It is a model that uses educational research to induce dissonance within course participants in regard to their perceptions of what constitutes good and appropriate practice. Nevertheless, the model is also premised on the importance of respecting the practitioner’s own personal and local context, including the need to resolve dissonance in the face of competing paradigms. The findings of research, on this account, are not to be viewed as providing definitive answers to the problems of practice, as in the ‘theory into practice’ model of teacher education. Rather they act as a catalyst for change, by holding a mirror up to present practice and suggesting that things could be otherwise. Resolving the dissonance induced by viewing competing paradigms may then lead to a commitment to change. Without such a commitment, change is not binding. Copyright © 2000 The Hong Kong Institute of Education.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of International Conference on Teacher Education 1999: Teaching effectiveness and teacher development in the new century
Place of PublicationHong Kong
PublisherHong Kong Institute of Education
Pages1-8
ISBN (Print)9629490382
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Citation

Sankey, D., Mellor, E., & Bryant, S. L. (2000). Dissonance theory as a model for inducing change in student teachers' practice. In Proceedings of International Conference on Teacher Education 1999: Teaching effectiveness and teacher development in the new century [CD-ROM] (pp. 1-8). Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Education.

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