Differences between students with comorbid intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder and those with intellectual disability alone in the recognition of and reaction to emotions

Fuk Chuen HO, Sze Ching Cici LAM, Sing Kai LO

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

This study investigates whether students with intellectual disability (ID) alone differ from students with combined individual disability and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in their recognition of emotions. The ability to recognise emotions does not mean that students automatically know how to react to these emotions. Differences in performance on recognition and reaction tasks are examined. Participants were 20 primary 6 students who had ID with ASD and 20 primary 6 students who had ID without ASD from four special schools. The testing and training materials were adapted from a local teaching package. The results showed that both groups exhibited similar performance patterns in recognition tasks. Students with comorbid ASD exhibited inferior performance in tasks requiring reactions to complex emotions. Copyright © 2020 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Early online date05 Aug 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 05 Aug 2020

Citation

Ho, F.‑C., Lam, C. S.‑C., & Lo, S.‑K. (2020). Differences between students with comorbid intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder and those with intellectual disability alone in the recognition of and reaction to emotions. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10803-020-04630-0

Keywords

  • Intellectual disability
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Emotion recognition
  • Comorbid

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