Developing socially just citizenship education in divided contexts: The freedom to self-define and not define

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

This chapter considers the challenge of developing a socially just conception of citizenship education in ethno-nationally divided societies, where citizenship and understandings of the conflict-affected past are contested issues. In terms of citizenship education, one of the debates that often arises relates to the definition of citizenship or a ‘citizen identity’ – whether ‘citizenship’ should be tightly defined and then transmitted through the curriculum or whether it should be kept open to interpretation by individuals. The difference of views on national belonging in Northern Ireland originates in the British Protestant colonial settlement of the north of Ireland, the partition of the island in the early twentieth century, and real and perceived inequalities between Catholics and Protestants in terms of representation in government and access to employment and housing. Looking at the two case countries, Northern Ireland and Israel are state parties to a number of international treaties. Copyright © 2017 selection and editorial matter, Ann Marie Mealey, Pam Jarvis, Jan Fook and Jonathan Doherty; individual chapters, the contributors.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEveryday social justice and citizenship: Perspectives for the 21st century
EditorsAnn Marie MEALEY, Pam JARVIS, Jan FOOK, Jonathan DOHERTY
Place of PublicationAbingdon, Oxon; New York, NY
PublisherRoutledge
Pages115-129
ISBN (Electronic)9781315623986, 9781317227632, 9781317227656
ISBN (Print)9781138652804, 9780367430993
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2017

Citation

Hanna, H. (2017). Developing socially just citizenship education in divided contexts: The freedom to self-define and not define. In A. M. Mealey, P. Jarvis, J. Fook, & J. Doherty (Eds.), Everyday social justice and citizenship: Perspectives for the 21st century (pp. 115-129). Abingdon, Oxon; New York, NY: Routledge.

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