Developing rural Chinese children’s computational thinking through ­game-based learning and parental involvement

Xiangling ZHANG, Ahmed TLILI, Junhong GUO, David GRIFFITHS, Ronghuai HUANG, Chee Kit LOOI, Daniel BURGOS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The lack of teachers and equipment is a major obstacle to the implementation of Computational Thinking (CT) in education, particularly for rural schools. Although CT education has been investigated for many years, less attention has been paid to lower primary schools in rural areas. This study contributes to filling this gap by investigating the impact of three different learning approaches on the CT of grade-two primary school students in a rural area in China. Seventy-seven students were randomly assigned to three learning approaches, namely traditional lectures, Game-Based Learning (GBL) using a newly designed board game in classrooms, and GBL with parental involvement. The findings showed that both GBL approaches (i.e., with and without parents) significantly enhanced the students’ CT skills compared to the traditional approach. The findings also showed that the GBL approach with parental involvement significantly enhanced students’ attitudes toward learning CT compared with the other two approaches. Copyright © 2023 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-32
JournalThe Journal of Educational Research
Volume116
Issue number1
Early online dateJan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Citation

Zhang, X., Tlili, A., Guo, J., Griffiths, D., Huang, R., Looi, C.-K., & Burgos, D. (2023). Developing rural Chinese children’s computational thinking through ­game-based learning and parental involvement. The Journal of Educational Research, 116(1), 17-32. doi: 10.1080/00220671.2023.2167798

Keywords

  • Computational thinking
  • Game-based learning
  • Parental involvement
  • Rural education

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