Desiring to connect to nature: The effect of ostracism on ecological behavior

Kai Tak POON, Fei TENG, Tak Sang Jason CHOW, Zhansheng CHEN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three experiments tested whether ostracism increases ecological behaviors through increased desires to connect to nature. Compared with non-ostracized participants, ostracized participants reported higher desires to connect to nature (Experiments 1 and 3) and were more willing to behave ecologically (Experiments 2 and 3). Furthermore, increased desires to connect to nature mediated the effect of ostracism on ecological inclinations (Experiment 3). Together, these findings suggest that people try to cope with the pain of ostracism by connecting to the natural environment and behaving ecologically. They also highlight the significance of desires for nature connectedness in explaining why ostracism increases ecological behavior. Implications are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-122
JournalJournal of Environmental Psychology
Volume42
Early online dateMar 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

Citation

Poon, K.-T., Teng, F., Chow, J. T., & Chen, Z. (2015). Desiring to connect to nature: The effect of ostracism on ecological behavior. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 42, 116-122.

Keywords

  • Ostracism
  • Social exclusion
  • Ecological behavior
  • Nature connectedness

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