Curriculum reform and supporting structures at schools: Challenges for life skills planning for secondary school students in China (with particular reference to Hong Kong)

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Demand has risen for the introduction of career education in senior secondary schooling to enhance students’ transition from study to work. Against such a background, this paper aims to discuss the curriculum reforms and supporting structures in schools and to explore the challenges of life skills planning for secondary school students in China with particular reference to Hong Kong. Literature review and examples from Hong Kong and China indicate that although various Vocational (Career) Development Education and Career and Life Planning Education (CLPE) activities and school-based curriculum development take place at schools, a clear linkage between study opportunities and career choices, enhancement of learning experiences at work through activities such as job shadowing and provision of a curriculum to enhance career and life planning across years as dimensions of intervention, seem not to be found at secondary schools in Hong Kong. This paper will also look into the implications for future development of CLPE. Copyright © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-75
JournalEducational Research for Policy and Practice
Volume16
Issue number1
Early online dateNov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

Citation

Lee, J. C.-K. (2017). Curriculum reform and supporting structures at schools: Challenges for life skills planning for secondary school students in China (with particular reference to Hong Kong). Educational Research for Policy and Practice, 16(1), 61-75.

Keywords

  • Career and life planning education
  • China
  • Hong Kong
  • Curriculum development

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