Cultural variability in parent and child achievement attributions: A study from Hong Kong

Sivaneswary PHILLIPSON

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The primary aim of the present study was to investigate whether variations exist in child and parent attributions in predicting child academic achievement within a culture and between cultures. Participants were 158 students and their parents from three different primary schools in Hong Kong, including one British international school consisting of students who are predominantly from a British background and two Chinese public schools each with a distinct SES profile. This paper extends the findings of previous research whereby Western parents attribute their child's success to ability and Chinese parents attribute their child's success to effort. Additionally, this study found that the Chinese children's attributions differed according to the SES catchments of their schools; children from higher SES were inclined to attribute success to effort. The results are discussed in terms of parent and child attributions' prediction of child's academic achievement within Hong Kong's family demographic. Copyright © 2006 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)625-642
JournalEducational Psychology
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2006

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Hong Kong
attribution
parents
Parents
academic achievement
school
Students
Aptitude
primary school
student
Demography
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Research

Citation

Phillipson, S. (2006). Cultural variability in parent and child achievement attributions: A study from Hong Kong. Educational Psychology, 26(5), 625-642.

Keywords

  • Parent and child
  • Differences
  • Cross-cultural differences
  • Family
  • Academic achievement
  • Education
  • Interpersonal relations
  • Culture
  • Historical sociology