Could the Soviet-Ukrainian and Lateran models work in China?: New geopolitical concepts of post-Westphalian Sovereignty for the Tibetan question

Xu Hui Simon SHEN

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

Triggered by the 50th anniversary of the Dalai Lama’s exile from Tibet, the Tibet question has gained renewed world interest. By studying the possible points of overlapping interest between Beijing and Dharamsala, this paper puts forward a plausible new solution for the Tibet question. It does this by referencing two precedents in international relations that involve cleverly crafted reinterpretations of the traditional concept of sovereignty. They are the accession of the former Byelorussian and Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republics into the United Nations when they were still part of the Soviet Union, and the acknowledgement of the landless sovereignty of the Holy See by creating the Vatican State within Italy. Looking at whether modified versions of the two models might satisfy the criteria for compromise and be applicable to Tibet, this paper addresses the wider theoretical discussions that are ongoing in geopolitics and political geography by exploring whether these proposals could lead to further development of the post-Westphalian concept of international relations. Copyright © 2010 Simon Shen.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationHong Kong
PublisherHong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
ISBN (Print)9789624412116
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Citation

Shen, S. (2010). Could the Soviet-Ukrainian and Lateran models work in China?: New geopolitical concepts of post-Westphalian Sovereignty for the Tibetan question. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Keywords

  • Tibet (China) -- Politics and government
  • Tibet (China) -- Relations – China
  • Sovereignty

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Could the Soviet-Ukrainian and Lateran models work in China?: New geopolitical concepts of post-Westphalian Sovereignty for the Tibetan question'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.