Correlates of eating disorder in middle-aged and older adults: Evidence from 2007 British National Psychiatric Morbidity Survey

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Abstract

Objective: This study aims to investigate: (a) the association of eating disorders with childhood sexual abuse and recent stressful life events; (b) the coexistence of eating disorders and other common psychiatric disorders; and (c) the impact of eating disorders on obesity, medical conditions, and health service utilization. Method: We conducted secondary data analyses based on population-based study, which consists of a nationally representative sample of 2,870 community-dwelling adults aged 50 and above, interviewed in 2006 to 2007. Results and conclusion: The 12-month prevalence of eating disorders was 2.61%. Multivariate analyses revealed that eating disorders were more common among younger age groups, women, and those who reported stressful life events. In addition, eating disorders were significantly related to anxiety disorders, agoraphobia, panic disorder, obesity, and cancer. Discussion: This study supports the notion that eating disorders in older adults are associated with a number of psychosocial, psychiatric, and medical conditions. Copyright © 2013 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1106-1120
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume25
Issue number7
Early online dateJul 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

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eating disorder
morbidity
Psychiatry
Morbidity
evidence
Obesity
Independent Living
Agoraphobia
event
Panic Disorder
Sex Offenses
coexistence
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Surveys and Questionnaires
Anxiety Disorders
sexual violence
Health Services
age group
health service
cancer

Citation

Ng, I. S. F., Cheung, K. C. K., & Chou, K.-L. (2013). Correlates of eating disorder in middle-aged and older adults: Evidence from 2007 British National Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. Journal of Aging and Health, 25(7), 1106-1120.

Keywords

  • Eating disorders
  • Risk factors
  • Comorbidity
  • Medical condition
  • Obesity