Conflict or collaboration: Native and non-native teachers in South Korea, Japan and Hong Kong

David Robert CARLESS

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Within the region, a number of countries have viewed the importation of native speakers of English as a means of enhancing English language teaching in schools and promoting internationalization or cultural exchange. Adherents of such programmes anticipate benefits in exposing learners to authentic input, the use of English for genuine communication, and opportunities for mutual staff development or fruitful cross-fertilisation of ideas. Critics, on the other hand, point to a perceived lack of value for money, the difficulties of foreigners integrating into local systems, and conflicts between local and expatriate personnel. This paper will make some comparative observations about three schemes, EPIK (English Program in Korea), JET (Japan exchange and teaching program) and NET (Native-speaking English teacher), including their characteristics, successes and ongoing challenges. I will argue that both native and non0native speakers have their particular strengths and will propose some ways in which native-speakers might best be utilized in supporting enhanced standards of English in schools.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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South Korea
Hong Kong
Japan
cultural relations
teaching program
teacher
internationalization
school
Korea
English language
speaking
critic
personnel
staff
communication
lack
Teaching

Citation

Carless, D. (2002, December). Conflict or collaboration: Native and non-native teachers in South Korea, Japan and Hong Kong. Paper presented at the 7th English in South East Asia Conference: Changing Responses to Challenging Times, Hong Kong Baptist University, China.

Keywords

  • English language
  • Teaching
  • South Korea
  • Japan
  • Hong Kong