Confidence and trust in public institution natural hazards management: Case studies in urban and rural China

Alex Y. H. LO, Ting On Lewis CHEUNG, Anna Ka Yin LEE, Bixia XU

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research aims to investigate the extent to which urban and rural residents trust grassroots-level institutions and how this might affect community resilience to environmental change in China. It focuses on the commitments of institutional actors and their capacities to manage natural hazards and coordinate the community's response. Semistructured interviews were conducted with megacity (Tianjin) and remote village (Wolong) residents in China. We found that public confidence in grassroots-level institutions is limited due to inherent constraints on resources and power. Residents of Wolong tend to recognize the commitment and role of those institutions in connecting individuals with one another, whereas their urban counterparts in Tianjin remain skeptical. Issues of solidarity might account for this difference. These findings will have implications for state–society cooperation and disaster risk comanagement in both urban and rural China. Copyright © 2016 by American Association of Geographers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)475-484
JournalThe Professional Geographer
Volume68
Issue number3
Early online dateJan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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grassroots level
hazard management
natural hazard
comanagement
megacity
community response
disaster
environmental change
village
resource
public institution

Citation

Lo, A. Y., Cheung, L. T. O., Lee, A. K.-Y., & Xu, B. (2016). Confidence and trust in public institution natural hazards management: Case studies in urban and rural China. The Professional Geographer, 68(3), 475-484.

Keywords

  • China
  • Hazards management
  • Institutional trust
  • Natural hazards
  • Public confidence