Computer assisted vocabulary learning: Framework and tracking user data

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

It is proposed that CAVL applications can be divided into two broad categories: lexical programs/tasks and lexical resources/aids. There are three major types of lexical resources/aids: open Google searches, electronic dictionaries and lexical concordancers; they provide learners with access to meaning and other lexical information about the unknown items encountered during the learning process. Lexical programs/tasks can be further divided into four types: incidental learning with lexical glosses, CMC lexical-based tasks, computerized vocabulary exercises, and dedicated CAVL programs. Such a distinction is made based on the prominence each gives to vocabulary learning in terms of tool/tutor, implicit/explicit learning and meaning/form focusing. Equally important is the user tracking system built into each application, as tracking data can reveal how learners actually interacted with the learning system (Fischer, 2007; 2012). A review of tracking systems used in CAVL shows that multiple technologies/means have been used in tracking user actions and further research needs to focus on the identification of the key user actions related to learning outcome. Only with a good tracking system, can CALL effectiveness be proven, useful design features be identified and the appropriate programs be selected. Copyright © 2013 Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium, Texas State University.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLearner-computer interaction in language education: A festschrift in honor of Robert Fischer
EditorsPhilip HUBBARD, Mathias SCHULZE, Bryan SMITH
Place of PublicationSan Marcos, Texas
PublisherComputer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium, Texas State University
Pages230-243
ISBN (Print)9780989120807, 0989120805
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

vocabulary
learning
language instruction
gloss
tutor
resources
dictionary
search engine
learning process
electronics

Citation

Ma, Q. (2013). Computer assisted vocabulary learning: Framework and tracking user data. In P. Hubbard, M. Schulze, & B. Smith (Eds.), Learner-computer interaction in language education: A festschrift in honor of Robert Fischer (pp. 230-243). San Marcos, Texas: Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium, Texas State University.

Keywords

  • Computer assisted vocabulary learning
  • Tutor
  • Tool
  • Tracking
  • User actions