Competition between politicized and depoliticized versions of civic education curricula: The case of Hong Kong

Yan Wing LEUNG, Wai Wa Timothy YUEN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article discusses the influence of Confucianism on civic education, focusing on Hong Kong as a particular case of concern. The development of Hong Kong’s civic education is sketched, highlighting the competitions between the politicized and depoliticized versions of the civic education curriculum. The notion that a depoliticized civic education, supported by Confucian ideals, is necessarily a distinctive feature of Asian civic education, is then critiqued. Finally, the article argues that an eclectic version of civic education, comprising both political and moral components, is warranted. This is what Confucian tenets really mean. It is hoped that the discussion here will help reflect whether Confucian tenets justify depoliticization of education and civic education. This is important given the growing aspiration for democracy and citizens’ participation in civil societies, particularly those whose cultural roots are in the Confucian tradition. Moreover, the authors hope that the dialogues between Confucian traditions and the Western traditions discussed in the article can shed light on some thought-provoking issues of interest to an international readership, particularly as China is becoming more influential globally. Copyright © 2012 Symposium Journals Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45‑56
JournalCitizenship, Social and Economics Education
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Citation

Leung, Y. W., & Yuen, W. W. T. (2012). Competition between politicized and depoliticized versions of civic education curricula: The case of Hong Kong. Citizenship, Social and Economics Education, 11(1), 45‑56.

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