Competency of health information acquisition and intention for active health behaviour in children

Lawrence Tak-Ming LAM, Mary K. P. LAM

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the association between competency of health information acquisition, both online and offline, and the intention for active health behaviour in children. Methods: This study was a population-based cross-sectional health survey utilising a two-stage random cluster sampling design conducted in a major city. Competency of health information acquisition was assessed by a rating scale designed specifically for this study. The intention for active health behaviour was measured by a vignettebased question. Data were analysed using multiple logistic regression modelling techniques with adjustment to the cluster sampling effect and potential confounding factors. Results: After adjusting for potential confounding factors and the cluster sampling effect, intention for active health behaviour was significantly associated with competency of health information acquisition both online (OR=1.06, 95%C.I.=1.01-1.12) and offline (OR=1.08, 95%C.I.=1.02-1.18). Conclusions: Results suggested a positive relationship between competency of health information acquisition, both online and offline, and the intention for active health behaviour which have important public health implications on child health behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Under License of Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Archives of Medicine
Volume8
Issue number75
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Health Behavior
Health
Licensure
Social Adjustment
Child Behavior
Health Surveys
Public Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Population

Citation

Lam, L. T., & Lam, M. K. P. (2015). Competency of health information acquisition and intention for active health behaviour in children. International Archives of Medicine, 8(75). Retrieved June 23, 2016, from http://dx.doi.org/10.3823/1674

Keywords

  • Children
  • Epidemiology study
  • Health behavior
  • Health information seeking
  • Intention
  • Survey