Comparing eye-tracking data of children with high-functioning ASD, comorbid ADHD, and of a control watching social videos

Kwan Lan Vicky TSANG, Patrick Chun Kau CHU

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are known to have sensory-perceptual processing deficits that weaken their abilities to attend and perceive social stimuli in daily living contexts. Since daily social episodes consist of subtle dynamic changes in social information, any failure to attend to or process subtle human nonverbal cues, such as facial expression, postures, and gestures, might lead to inappropriate social interaction. Traditional behavioral rating scales or assessment tools based on static social scenes have limitations in capturing the moment-to-moment changes in social scenarios. An eye-tracking assessment, which can be administered in a video-based mode, is therefore preferred, to augment clinical observation. In this study, using the single-case comparison design, the eye-tracking data of three participants, a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), another with comorbid attention deficit-hyperactive disorder (ADHD), and a neurotypical control, are captured while they view a video of social scenarios. The eye-tracking experiment has helped answer the research question: How does social attention differ between the three participants? By predefining areas of interest (AOIs), their visual attention on relevant or irrelevant social stimuli, how fast each participant attends to the first social stimuli appearing in the videos, for how long each participant continues to attend to those stimuli within the AOIs, and the gaze shifts between multiple social stimuli appearing concurrently in the same social scene are captured, compared, and analyzed in a video-based eye-tracking experiment. Copyright © 2018 JoVE.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere58694
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Volume142
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018

Citation

Tsang, V., & Chu, P. C. K. (2018). Comparing eye-tracking data of children with high-functioning ASD, comorbid ADHD, and of a control watching social videos. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 142. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.3791/58694

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