Comparative study: Supervisory behaviours of native and non-native language speaking supervisors in teacher training at Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd)

Philip Edward LYON, Yee Fan Sylvia TANG, Andrew Anthony TIMMINS, Valentina KLENOWSKI, Sharon Lynne BRYANT

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper reports on a pilot study research conducted at the Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd) with student teachers and their teaching practice supervisors. Difference between supervisory discourse of native speaking (Cantonese) and non-native speaking (English) supervisors are explained using a Student Mediation Model to explore how Cantonese students learn from their English speaking supervisors. The research focuses on the nature and quality of student-supervisor discourse to determine whether what is perceived is what is intended. The results may be a model of staff development. Theories of Communication, Semiotics and Symbolic Interaction, as well as interpersonal and intercultural theories are also applied to the model. A survey of HKIEd students in spring 1996 revealed their need to be briefed on the communication style impact of non-native speaking supervisors. If there is misunderstanding between student expectations and supervisory behaviour a need for staff development for supervisors would be indicated. Staff development research indicates that successful implementation calls for staff development for the supervisors. Early analysis of the data has begun to reveal that there is indeed a difference and dissonance in what the students receive related to what the supervisors are sending. Continuing analysis will occur over this summer with a full report for the conference.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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Citation

Lyon, P., Tang, S., Timmins, A., Klenowski, V., & Bryant, S. L. (1996, November). Comparative study: Supervisory behaviours of native and non-native language speaking supervisors in teacher training at Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd). Paper presented at the Hong Kong Educational Research Association (HKERA) 13th Annual Conference: Restructuring Schools in Changing Societies, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, China.