Civic education curriculum reform in Hong Kong: What should be the direction under Chinese sovereignty?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article uses results from a cross-national analysis of the impact of varying approaches to civic education curriculum delivery on three learning outcomes, to draw conclusions about the value of a government-mandated compulsory, independent subject of civic education in the school curriculum. It starts from the context of Hong Kong, where there have been repeated calls for the government to reform civic education, and compares this context with that of England, where citizenship education was made a statutory subject in 2002. The article then examines from the cases of 25 societies whether a compulsory approach to and/or independent subject of civic education is associated with better learning of civic knowledge, knowledge of democracy, and patriotism. Finding that the impact of curricular approaches is somewhat negligible taking other factors into consideration, the article concludes that civic education reformers should consider the costs of limiting school autonomy in curriculum delivery. Copyright © 2011 University of Cambridge, Faculty of Education.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)425-443
JournalCambridge Journal of Education
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

education curriculum
sovereignty
Hong Kong
reform
education
curriculum
patriotism
school
learning
citizenship
autonomy
democracy
costs
society
Values

Citation

Fairbrother, G. P., & Kennedy, K. J. (2011). Civic education curriculum reform in Hong Kong: What should be the direction under Chinese sovereignty? Cambridge Journal of Education, 41(4), 425-443.

Keywords

  • Citizenship education
  • Civic education
  • Hong Kong
  • Curriculum reform
  • Policy instruments
  • Democracy
  • Patriotism