Citizenship, economy and social exclusion of mainland Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong

Kam Yee LAW, Kim-ming LEE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hong Kong is often viewed as a Chinese immigrants' city. This article discusses three interrelated dimensions of the social exclusion of migrants designated as “new” Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong. First, it is argued that globalisation has triggered intense economic rivalry among world cities as they undertake economic restructuring. Second, the political attempts of territorial states to establish their own legitimacy and strengthen their governing capacity are major catalysts that induce the social exclusion of immigrants. Third, the nature and strength of local place-based social identity is vital to determine the difficulties new immigrants face in being included in the host society. After recounting the history of Chinese immigrants and their recent profile in Hong Kong, the article examines the relationships between Hong Kong's economic development and the state's immigration policies, and how Hong Kong's state policies have constructed a form of Hong Kong identity vis-à-vis Mainland Chinese, drawing out the mechanisms that determine the social exclusion of Mainland immigrants since the 1990s. Copyright © 2006 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-242
JournalJournal of Contemporary Asia
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Citation

Law, K.-Y., & Lee, K.-M. (2006). Citizenship, economy and social exclusion of mainland Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong. Journal of Contemporary Asia, 36(2), 217-242. doi: 10.1080/00472330680000131

Keywords

  • Citizenship
  • Economy
  • Descrimination
  • Hong Kong
  • Identity
  • Migration
  • Social exclusion

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Citizenship, economy and social exclusion of mainland Chinese immigrants in Hong Kong'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.