Child physical aggression: The contributions of fathers’ job support, mothers’ coparenting, fathers’ authoritative parenting and child’s theory of mind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

This study analyzed how and to what degree fathers’ job support and mothers’ co-parenting affect the manifestation of physical aggression in children. It also investigated the possible mediating roles of fathers’ authoritative parenting and child’s theory of mind (ToM). The participants were 324 Hong Kong Chinese children (168 girls; M = 70.39 months) and their parents. While the mothers were asked to rate their child’s physical aggression, the fathers were asked to complete questionnaires about how authoritative their parenting behaviors were, their spouse’s co-parenting behaviors, as well as the support they felt they were receiving from work. Research assistants also conducted individual interviews with all children to assess their ToM. Our results showed that although the direct influence of fathers’ job support and mothers’ co-parenting did not have a significant effect on child aggression, the chain mediation effects of “fathers’ job support (Model 1)/Mothers’ co-parenting (Model 2) → fathers’ authoritative parenting → child ToM → child’s physical aggression” were significant. These findings suggest that child’s aggression is sequentially shaped by contextual, process, and individual factors. Copyright © 2019 Springer Nature B.V.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1085-1105
JournalChild Indicators Research
Volume13
Issue number3
Early online date04 Jul 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2020

Citation

Lau, E. Y. H., & Li, J.-B. (2020). Child physical aggression: The contributions of fathers’ job support, mothers’ coparenting, fathers’ authoritative parenting and child’s theory of mind. Child Indicators Research, 13(3), 1085-1105. doi: 10.1007/s12187-019-09660-4

Keywords

  • Job support
  • Co-parenting
  • Authoritative parenting
  • Theory of mind
  • Aggression

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Child physical aggression: The contributions of fathers’ job support, mothers’ coparenting, fathers’ authoritative parenting and child’s theory of mind'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.