Can dual compression offer better mandarin speech intelligibility and sound quality than fast-acting compression?

Yuan CHEN, Lena L. N. WONG, Volker KUEHNEL, Jinyu QIAN, Solveig Christina VOSS, Shangqiguo WANG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of dual compression for Mandarin-speaking hearing aid users. Dual compression combines fast and slow compressors operating simultaneously across all frequency channels. The study participants were 31 hearing aid users with symmetrical moderate-to-severe hearing loss, with a mean age of 67 years. A new pair of 20-channel behind-the-ear hearing aids (i.e., Phonak Bolero B90-P) was used during the testing. The results revealed a significant improvement in speech reception thresholds in noise when switching from fast-acting compression to dual compression. The sound quality ratings revealed that most listeners preferred dual compression to fast-acting compression for listening effort, listening comfort, speech clarity, and overall sound quality at +4 dB signal-to-noise ratio. These results are consistent with predictions based on the theoretical understanding of dual and fast-acting compression. However, whether these results can be generalized to other languages or other dual compression systems should be verified by future studies. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
JournalTrends in hearing
Volume25
Early online date12 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Citation

Chen, Y., Wong, L. L. N., Kuehnel, V., Qian, J., Voss, S. C., & Wang, S. (2021). Can dual compression offer better mandarin speech intelligibility and sound quality than fast-acting compression? Trends in hearing, 25. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1177/2331216521997610

Keywords

  • Hearing aids
  • Chinese
  • Speech perception
  • Compression
  • Sound quality

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Can dual compression offer better mandarin speech intelligibility and sound quality than fast-acting compression?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.