Body–object interaction effect in word recognition and its relationship with screen time in Chinese children

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Abstract

A sample of 144 s- and 150 fourth-grade Chinese children was recruited to investigate the influence of body–object interactions (BOIs) on word recognition, i.e., how easily they could interact physically with each word’s referent. The moderation on this relationship of children’s screen time for entertainment purposes (i.e., the viewing or use of any device with a screen) was also examined. In a lexical decision task, the children were asked to judge whether each item was a real Chinese word. Each real word was assigned a BOI rating score. Model analysis showed that the BOI rating was a significant predictor of the children’s word recognition performances. The children recognized the words with higher BOI ratings at higher accuracy rates and higher response speeds more than the words with lower BOI ratings, showing a BOI effect. These results suggest an involvement of sensorimotor information in processing concepts. As well, the results showed a moderating effect of screen time on the BOI effect. With the increase of screen time, the BOI effect was reduced in terms of response speed. Moreover, the influence of the screen time on the BOI effect was larger in the second graders than in the fourth graders. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V.
Original languageEnglish
JournalReading and Writing
Early online date29 Jan 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Jan 2022

Citation

Xu, Z., & Liu, D. (2022). Body–object interaction effect in word recognition and its relationship with screen time in Chinese children. Reading and Writing. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s11145-021-10238-2

Keywords

  • Bodily interactions
  • Concept construction
  • Digital tools
  • Lexical meaning
  • Sensorimotor representation
  • Word recognition

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