Body surveillance predicts young Chinese women’s social anxiety: Testing a mediation model

Fei TENG, Kai Tak POON

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

This study investigated whether body surveillance would positively predict young Chinese women’s social anxiety and its potential mechanisms. A total of 218 young Chinese women (Mage = 21 years-old, range = 16–28) participated. The results showed that body surveillance positively predicted women’s appearance-based rejection sensitivity through body shame and need to belong, which in turn predicted social anxiety. These results suggest that, in addition to intrapersonal consequences, body surveillance may also influence women’s interpersonal well-being. Our research contributes to a better understanding of the influences of self-objectification by incorporating interpersonal distress. Copyright © 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)623-635
JournalJournal of Gender Studies
Volume29
Issue number6
Early online date14 Feb 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Citation

Teng, F., & Poon, K.-T. (2020). Body surveillance predicts young Chinese women’s social anxiety: Testing a mediation model. Journal of Gender Studies, 29(6), 623-635. doi: 10.1080/09589236.2020.1728523

Keywords

  • Body surveillance
  • Social anxiety
  • Body shame
  • Need to belong
  • Appearance-based rejection sensitivity

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