Beyond citizenship? Some conceptual and practical concerns

Laurance Joseph SPLITTER

Research output: Book/ReportBooks

Abstract

Contemporary conceptions of citizenship are being pulled in various directions, and the tension produced should be a matter of concern to researchers and educators. On the one hand, citizenship, as a mode of political organization, is seen as important for strengthening and safe-guarding the well-being and rights of ordinary persons, in the context of such threats as terrorism, imperialism, materialism, and “identity-confusion”. On the other hand, the dissolution of national and cultural barriers through globalization leads many to question the relevance of traditional (i.e. nationalistic) citizenship which seeks to affiliate some and divide others, in a world where we – and the problems we all face are all, inevitably, connected. I do not pretend to stand outside this debate. I am inclined toward the latter, “post-nationalist” perspective, but would go further in questioning the viability of “global citizenship” and, hence, whether we – and I am thinking particularly of “we educators” – really need the concept of citizenship at all. Better, I suggest, to go with an even older concept: that of personhood, albeit considered in relational and cosmopolitan, rather than individualistic and parochial, terms. Copyright © 2010 Centre for Governance and Citizenship, The Hong Kong Institute of Education.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationHong Kong
PublisherThe Hong Kong Institute of Education
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Citation

Splitter, L. J. (2010). Beyond citizenship? Some conceptual and practical concerns. Hong Kong: Centre for Governance and Citizenship, The Hong Kong Institute of Education.

Keywords

  • Citizenship
  • Identity (Philosophical concept)
  • Cosmopolitanism

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