Attitudes towards action research: The case of curriculum leaders in Hong Kong

King Fai Sammy HUI, Wai Shing LI

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

Following the decision of the Education and Manpower Bureau to create a position of Primary School Master/Mistress (Curriculum Development) (PSM(CD)) in Hong Kong primary schools, it becomes significant to understand the beliefs which there curriculum leaders hold with respect to action research - as a means to help schools to reflect upon their strengths and to decide how best to bring about reform in curriculum. A survey of 209 PSM(CD)s suggested that in general they favoured using research in their work. A four-factor model indicated that the majority of the respondents perceived themselves as having the ability to do research, valued research for professional development and providing solutions to teaching and learning deficiencies, and found the action research course useful. The survey results showed that demonstrated research experience and holding higher degree qualification had no significant impact on attitudes to action research, but that those attitudes were associated positively with the participants' sense of self-efficacy, an internal locus of control and their commitment to their school. The work will contribute to gaining an understanding of how curriculum leaders' participation in school-based curriculum research and development can be facilitated. Copyright © 2005 De La Salle University, Philippines.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-137
JournalThe Asia-Pacific Education Researcher
Volume14
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

Citation

Hui, S. K.-F., & Li, W.-S. (2005). Attitudes towards action research: The case of curriculum leaders in Hong Kong. The Asia-Pacific Education Researcher, 14(2), 115-137.

Keywords

  • Teacher Education
  • Teacher Education and Professional Development

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