Are the effects always positive? Rethinking the role of parental social capital in the university choice process

Fang GAO, Jacky Chi Kit NG, Wing Sze Wincy LEE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

The extant literature on parental involvement in the university choice process sheds light on the positive impact of parents’ social capital on enrolment. Little research captures the complex dynamics of parental social capital that might within certain sociocultural and economic contexts compound the effects on university choice and access. This study contributes insight to address this gap, from the context of Hong Kong. It administered a questionnaire survey to 139 students and examined the role of parental social capital in students’ university aspirations. Moderated multiple regression analysis and simple slope analysis revealed that parent-student involvement – a main composite of parental social capital – weakened rather than strengthened the effect of parents’ cultural capital on the students’ educational aspirations. This study cautions us against a context-independent stance towards the value of parental social capital and warrants future research and policy work on how to optimise parental involvement in education. Copyright © 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Studies in Sociology of Education
Early online date09 Feb 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 09 Feb 2021

Citation

Gao, F., Ng, J. C. K., & Lee, W. W. S. (2021). Are the effects always positive? Rethinking the role of parental social capital in the university choice process. International Studies in Sociology of Education. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/09620214.2021.1886596

Keywords

  • Parental social capital
  • Interacting multiple capitals (IMC) model
  • University choice process
  • Hong Kong

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Are the effects always positive? Rethinking the role of parental social capital in the university choice process'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.