An initial exploration of student-teachers' conceptions of citizenship and citizenship education under the "One country, Two systems" in Hong Kong

Michael GOLBY, Kwai Heung MA

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

On 1 July 1997, Hong Kong became a Special Administration Region of the People Republic of China. The implementation of the “One country two systems”, a unique concept and a pioneer practice in the world, began. What does the identity of citizen under “One country, two systems” mean to student-teachers in Hong Kong? The new Civic Education syllabus for Junior forms is to be implemented in Sept. 1998. (Civic Education Standing Committee, 1997) Its objectives and contents embrace a comprehensive range of values, knowledge and skills; emphasizing the local, national and global contexts and the role of the citizen in each. To what extent did these foci fit in with student-teachers’ conceptions of citizenship? A survey by questionnaires of 280 Social Science elective student-teachers in an Institute of Education in Hong Kong was conducted in Dec., 1997, followed by semi-structured interviews of 14 student-teachers in the sample. Analysis of the survey and interview results revealed the characteristics of student-teachers’ conceptions of citizenship and the factors in shaping them. Their interest and concern relating to the promotion of Civic Education was also explored. The implication on Civic education curriculum development in teacher education was then discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Citation

Golby, M., & Ma, K. H. (1999, February). An initial exploration of student-teachers' conceptions of citizenship and citizenship education under the "One country, Two systems" in Hong Kong. Paper presented at the International Conference on Teacher Education 1999: Teaching Effectiveness and Teacher Development in the New Century, Hong Kong Institute of Education, China.

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