An exploratory study of parents’ perceptions of teaching sex education in Hong Kong preschools

Research output: Contribution to conferencePapers

Abstract

Chinese society has, traditionally, perceived sex as a taboo subject, and as such, is seldom discussed openly, and rarely taught in schools. Under these circumstances, most Hong Kong people never learn about sex education during their formal school years. With an increase in the number of sex-related crimes in Hong Kong, education is becoming increasingly important. Since learning in early childhood influences a person's future values and behaviour, sex education should be implemented early, preferably in preschools (Roffman, 2002; Woody, 2002). To implement effective sex education in preschools, parents’ views are important. This pilot study aims to investigate Hong Kong parents’ perceptions towards implementing sex education programmes in preschools. One kindergarten and one childcare centre were randomly selected for this study. A total of 12 parents were interviewed. The findings indicated that most parents lacked the confidence to discuss sex-related issues with their children mainly because they had insufficient knowledge and skills, and also felt embarrassed. However, to overcome these inadequacies and feelings they were willing to better equip themselves with the necessary knowledge and skills for the benefit of their children.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Citation

Lai, Y. C. (2005, November). An exploratory study of parents’ perceptions of teaching sex education in Hong Kong preschools. Paper presented at the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE 2005) Conference: Creative Dissent: Constructive Solutions, Parramatta, New South Wales.

Keywords

  • Early childhood education
  • Alt. title: A pilot study of the implementation of sex education in Hong Kong pre-schools: Parents' perceptions

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