Affluence, poverty, and ecology: Obligation, international relations, and sustainable development

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Abstract

Effective efforts to protect the global environment will require the willing cooperation of the world's poor. Persuading them to join international environmental agreements and to choose environmentally sustainable development requires substantial concessions from the affluent industrialized countries, including additional financial assistance and technology transfers. The affluent countries ought to provide such assistance to the world's poor for ethical reasons. Doing so would promote transnational distributive justice, which is defined here as a fair and equitable distribution among countries of benefits, burdens, and decision-making authority, in this case associated with transnational environmental relations. Conceptions of distributive justice examined include utilitarianism, human rights, causality/responsibility, impartiality, and principles derived from Kantian and Rawlsian ethics. Copyright © 1997 Indiana University Press.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-138
JournalEthics and the Environment
Volume2
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1997

Citation

Harris, P. G. (1997). Affluence, poverty, and ecology: Obligation, international relations, and sustainable development. Ethics and the Environment, 2(2), 121-138.

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